Extreme heat: heat waves

  • By Digital Marketing
  • 12 Jun, 2017

Protect yourself on a really hot day, awning is one of the solution!

Many places in Canada have a high number of extreme heat events, often called "heat waves." Extreme heat can put your health at risk, causing illnesses like heat stroke and even death. It is important to take steps to protect yourself and your family.

What are extreme heat events?
Extreme heat events involve high temperatures and sometimes high humidity. Although the level of temperature extremes may vary between regions, unusually high heat can have negative impacts on your health.

Health risks
Your body produces heat, especially during physical activity. Hot air, sun rays, and hot surfaces also heat your body. This heat is lost by contact with cool air and by sweat production, which cools your body as it evaporates.

Weather conditions play a big role in how your body regulates its temperature. For example, if it's windy, sweat evaporates faster, which helps to cool you. But high humidity slows down this process, contributing to increased body temperature.

Heat illnesses can affect you quickly, and can lead to long-term health problems and even death. They are mainly caused by being over-exposed to extreme heat especially if you are doing too much for your age and physical condition. Heat illnesses include:

  • heat edema (swelling of hands, feet, and ankles)
  • heat rash
  • heat cramps (muscle cramps)
  • heat fainting
  • heat exhaustion
  • heat stroke
While extreme heat can put everyone at risk from heat illnesses, health risks are greatest for:

  • older adults
  • infants and young children
  • people with chronic illnesses (like breathing problems, mental illness, and heart problems)
  • people who work in the heat
  • people who exercise in the heat
  • homeless people
  • low-income earners
If you are taking medication or have a health condition, ask your doctor or pharmacist if it increases your health risk in the heat. Some medications can make your skin more sensitive to ultraviolet (UV) rays as well. Talk to your health care provider if you have any questions about your medication.

Safety Tips
Heat illnesses are preventable. During extreme heat, the most important thing is to keep cool and hydrated.
“The sun’s rays through glass are responsible for almost 20% of the load on your air conditioner,” says Michelle Sahlin, Managing Director of PAMA . “Awnings reduce direct solar gain through windows.”

In fact, as environmental awareness grows in the United States and consumers increasingly try to reduce their carbon footprint, retractable awnings continue to gain favor.

Association suggests that awnings can reduce heat build up as much a 77%, cut air-conditioning use by 25% and lower energy bills by approximately 100 hours per year.
Follow these five steps to protect yourself and your family in very hot weather:

  • Prepare for the heat
  • Pay close attention to how you - and those around you - feel
  • Stay hydrated
  • Stay cool
  • Avoid exposure to extreme heat when outdoors
Step 1 - Prepare for the heat
  • Tune in regularly to local weather forecasts and alerts so you know when to take extra care.
  • Arrange for regular visits by family members, neighbours or friends during very hot days in case you need help. Visitors can help identify signs of heat illness that could be missed over the phone.
  • Find ways to keep cool before the hot weather starts. If you have an air conditioner, make sure it works properly. If you have ceiling fans or other fans they can help as long as the humidity isn't high. Find an air-conditioned spot close by where you can cool off for a few hours on very hot days. This will help you cope with the heat.
  • Have cool drinks in your vehicle and keep your gas tank topped up.
Step 2 - Pay close attention to how you - and those around you - feel
Heat stroke is a medical emergency!

Call 911 or your local emergency number immediately if you are caring for someone who has a high body temperature and is either unconscious, confused or has stopped sweating.

Watch for symptoms of heat illness, which include:

  • dizziness or fainting
  • nausea or vomiting
  • headache
  • rapid breathing and heartbeat
  • extreme thirst (dry mouth or sticky saliva)
  • decreased urination with unusually dark yellow urine
  • changes of behaviour in children (like sleepiness or temper tantrums)
If you have any of these symptoms during extreme heat, move to a cool place and drink liquids right away. Water is best.

While waiting for help - cool the person right away by:

  • moving them to a cool place, if you can
  • applying cold water to large areas of their skin or clothing
  • fanning the person as much as possible
Step 3 - Stay hydrated

Drink plenty of cool liquids (especially water) before you feel thirsty to decrease your risk of dehydration (not having enough fluids in your body). Thirst is not a good indicator of dehydration.

  • Remind yourself to drink water by leaving a glass by the sink.
  • Flavouring water with natural fruit juice may make it more appealing.
  • Eat more fruits and vegetables as they have a high water content.
  • If you eat less, you may need to drink more water.
  • Drink water before, during and after physical activity.
Step 4 - Stay cool

Dress for the weather

  • Wear loose-fitting, light-coloured clothing and a wide-brimmed hat made of breathable fabric.
  • When you buy sunglasses, make sure they provide protection against both UVA and UVB rays.
  • Take a break from the heat
If you must do physical activity in extreme heat, take extra breaks, remove gear to let your body cool off and drink lots of water. Don't expect your usual performance in hot weather. Give your body time to recover after being in the heat.

Keep your home cool

  • Make meals that don't need to be cooked in an oven.
  • Block the sun by closing awnings, curtains or blinds during the day.
  • If safe, open your windows at night to let cooler air into your home.
  • If you have an air conditioner with a thermostat, keep it set to the highest setting that is comfortable (somewhere between 22ºC/72ºF and 26ºC/79ºF). This will reduce your energy costs and provide you with needed relief. If you are using a window air conditioner, cool only one room where you can go for heat relief.
If your home is extremely hot

  • Take cool showers or baths until you feel refreshed.
  • Use a fan to help you stay cool and aim the air flow in your direction.
  • Spend a few hours in a cool place. It could be a tree-shaded area, swimming facility or an air-conditioned spot like a shopping mall, grocery store, or public library.
Step 5 - Avoid exposure to extreme heat when outdoors

Never leave people or pets inside a parked vehicle or in direct sunlight.
  • When the outside air temperature is 23ºC/73ºF, the temperature inside a vehicle can be extremely dangerous - more than 50ºC/122ºF.
Reschedule or plan outdoor activities during cooler parts of the day.
  • Before heading out, check the Air Quality Health Index in your area, if available. Air pollution tends to be at higher levels during very hot days.
  • Plan strenuous outdoor activities for cooler days, or choose a cooler location like a place with air conditioning or with tree shade.
Avoid sun exposure. Find or bring shade when possible.
  • Tree-shaded areas can be as much as 5ºC/9ºF cooler than the surrounding area.
  • Shade yourself by wearing a wide-brimmed, breathable hat, or using an umbrella.
  • Wear loose-fitting, light-coloured clothing made of breathable fabric.
  • Wear sunglasses that have UVA and UVB protection.
  • Use a sunscreen with sun protection factor (SPF) 15 or higher and follow the manufacturer's directions. Don't use sunscreen on a child less than 6 months old.
Remember!
Sunscreen will help protect against the sun's ultraviolet (UV) rays, but not from the heat.

Source: https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/sun-safety/extreme-heat-heat-waves.html
Check out our ON SALE ADALIA EXTREME AWNING collection on selected fabric colors! 

Cover-Tech News & Events

By Digital Marketing 12 Jun, 2017
Many places in Canada have a high number of extreme heat events, often called "heat waves." Extreme heat can put your health at risk, causing illnesses like heat stroke and even death. It is important to take steps to protect yourself and your family.

What are extreme heat events?
Extreme heat events involve high temperatures and sometimes high humidity. Although the level of temperature extremes may vary between regions, unusually high heat can have negative impacts on your health.

Health risks
Your body produces heat, especially during physical activity. Hot air, sun rays, and hot surfaces also heat your body. This heat is lost by contact with cool air and by sweat production, which cools your body as it evaporates.

Weather conditions play a big role in how your body regulates its temperature. For example, if it's windy, sweat evaporates faster, which helps to cool you. But high humidity slows down this process, contributing to increased body temperature.

Heat illnesses can affect you quickly, and can lead to long-term health problems and even death. They are mainly caused by being over-exposed to extreme heat especially if you are doing too much for your age and physical condition. Heat illnesses include:

  • heat edema (swelling of hands, feet, and ankles)
  • heat rash
  • heat cramps (muscle cramps)
  • heat fainting
  • heat exhaustion
  • heat stroke
While extreme heat can put everyone at risk from heat illnesses, health risks are greatest for:

  • older adults
  • infants and young children
  • people with chronic illnesses (like breathing problems, mental illness, and heart problems)
  • people who work in the heat
  • people who exercise in the heat
  • homeless people
  • low-income earners
If you are taking medication or have a health condition, ask your doctor or pharmacist if it increases your health risk in the heat. Some medications can make your skin more sensitive to ultraviolet (UV) rays as well. Talk to your health care provider if you have any questions about your medication.

Safety Tips
Heat illnesses are preventable. During extreme heat, the most important thing is to keep cool and hydrated.
By Digital Marketing 17 Apr, 2017

According to the American Society of Heating and Air Conditioning and Air Conditioning Engineers, an awning can reduce heat gain by 55 to 65 percent on south facing windows and 72 to 77 percent on west facing windows. The European Solar Shading Organization indicates in one of its reports that solar shading products including awnings, can help users experience energy savings of up to 10 percent.

Tests have shown that the area beneath an awnings canopy can be as much as 20° cooler. Temperatures inside are cooler and air-conditioning costs are reduced.

Retractable awnings have become increasingly popular in America. Europeans have been using them for many years because energy costs more there and air-conditioning units are less common.

In fact, as environmental awareness grows in the United States and consumers increasingly try to reduce their carbon footprint, retractable awnings continue to gain favor. The Professional Awning Manufacturers

Association suggests that awnings can reduce heat build up as much a 77%, cut air-conditioning use by 25% and lower energy bills by approximately 100 hours per year.

The group also notes that retractable awnings can cut costs in every climate. It notes that Seattle and Boston or experienced significant energy consumption reduction. Seattle cut cooling energy consumption by as much as 69% and Boston cut cooling energy consumption by as much as 33%. In contrast, retractable awnings in Phoenix cut energy use by about 26%. Regardless of climate, retractable awnings can moderate indoor temperatures and cut down your carbon footprint.

To maximize energy efficiency with little effort consider the following factors when using retractable awnings:

The projection of the awning - how far it extends - will affect how much shade is provided beneath it and inside your home. Also consider the pitch or angle of shade the awning provides to block out as much sun as possible. Buying accessories like sun sensors and motors will maximize use of the awning and minimize the amount of attention it requires.

By Digital Marketing 24 Feb, 2017
America’s Southwest is full of breathtaking canyons, but none as famous or as widely visited as the Grand Canyon. This world-famous landmark offers wondrous views, spectacular hiking, exhilarating whitewater rafting and countless adventures. One look across the enormous chasm confirms just why this inspirational place is one of the seven natural wonders of the world and a must-see destination for so many travelers. The park also protects a wealth of biological diversity, including numerous endemic and threatened species and several rare ecosystems.

To learn more about the human history of the park, visit   Grand Canyon National Park’s website.

By Digital Marketing 24 Feb, 2017
Vancouver became Canada’s third Olympic host city after winning the vote on the second ballot over PyeongChang, South Korea. But unlike the first two times the Olympic Games came to Canada when the host nation went without a gold medal, this time there were a record number of trips to the top of the podium. Canada’s 14 gold medals were the most ever won by one country at a Winter Games while the 26 total medals was a Canadian high.

Ski jumping at the Olympic Games is contested on two different hills, designated as “normal” and “large” based on the furthest distance that a jumper is able to safely travel. Normal hills are between 85m and 109m while large hills are greater than 110m.

Results are based on both the distance traveled as well as the jumper’s body position in the air and upon landing. Each hill has a K-point based on its size (95m for normal hill; 125m for large hill). A jump to the K-point is worth 60 points. Five judges evaluate each jump for style on a scale of 0 to 20. The highest and lowest scores are dropped with the rest added together. Distance and style points are added together to get the total jump score.




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